Category Archives: Hunter

Prison!

LM Behind Bars 1

LM Behind Bars 1

I can still hunt from here, Mum!

LM Behind Bars 2

LM Behind Bars 2

Little Monkey surveys the world from her prison; ever ready to charge out and protect her territory – or just bark at everything passing by!

LM Behind Bars 3

LM Behind Bars 3

Nothing escapes this hunter.

Now if I would just open the door a tad!

 

Monkeying Around

Little Monkey 1

Little Monkey 1

I was sitting on the stoep with my daughter, enjoying a relaxing drink in the early hours of the evening, when we noticed Little Monkey playing on the lawn.

I like how you can clearly see the German Shepherd in her face here.

Little Monkey 2

Little Monkey 2

The green thing was once one of my hanging baskets, waiting for new plants, that LM had stolen from the bottom of the tree. She has great fun chewing it to pieces.

Here she had both of her front feet in the basket and was pulling away at the plastic.

Little Monkey 3

Little Monkey 3

She has killed it. Mission Accomplished!

 

Action!

LM in Full Pursuit

LM in Full Pursuit

Look at the amazing Little Monkey, tearing across the lawn in full pursuit; back legs overtaking front legs as she runs like a cheetah; tail out for balance as she turns; mouth open as she barks her intent.

What is she chasing?

Not Fast Enough

Not Fast Enough

This large hadeda that had dared to potter nonchalantly round LM’s garden!

Why is this action shot so blurred? Well, I didn’t get a chance to call to the participants, “Wait a minute while I switch on my camera!” And there is no Action Replay!

OK, Little Monkey would happily replay the scenario for me –  in fact, trying to stop her running out full tilt is the problem!

But the hadeda? That was long gone!

post script: What’s a hadeda? It’s an ibis – Bostrychia hagedash – a large bird, about 76cm long, with a really loud annoying call of . . . Ha De Daaaa. According to wiki, it has powerful, broad wings that give it a quick take off. Hmmm – put to good use here then!

A Stitch in Time

A Stitch in Time

A Stitch in Time

I have knitted since I was a young kid. When I was eight years old I knitted a jersey for myself – in 10 days. Yes, I know I was small, but my Mum kept making me knit it bigger. I was one of 5 kids, so I guess she wanted the clothes to last. That jersey still fit me when I was 11 years old; and I had grown a lot in those three years!

Nowadays, I like to knit these squares, with thick wool on large needles. I don’t have to look at what I’m doing, and I don’t have to think about it either. I usually listen to music or watch something. (When it is an exciting movie, I look down and find I have knitted a long rectangle instead of a square!) I normally only knit in winter, but somehow I just kept going last summer; so I ended up with all this.

Knitted Squares

Knitted Squares

I sew the squares up into small blankets to be used as a baby blanket, knee rug, or shoulder throw. I give them to a charity or take them to a local animal rescue shop to sell for funds for their organisation. This winter I have taken two already, and have three more here sewn up, and squares for at least two more blankets.

So a stitch in time makes a lot of blankets!

Play Ball

My Ball

My Ball

I gave my dog an old ball to play with.

She loved it so much she walked round and round the garden like a Teddy Bear. OK she walked round the pool.

Round and round the garden

Round and round the garden

And back round the other side.

I got Ballie

I got Ballie

Then she wasn’t too sure what to do with it.

Now what?

Now what?

So she tried to hide it in a corner.

Hmm, Not quite hidden

Hmm, not quite hidden

Then she trotted back to me and I got her to drop it….. Eventually.

MY Ball

MY Ball

Still MY ball

STILL My Ball

OK You can Look at it

OK You can Look at it

Shortly after this she killed it. I heard the soft pop. Then she really did hide it. I’ve no idea where. At some point she will get it again, and lie in the middle of the lawn, killing it some more, by biting it into small pieces. She doesn’t eat the plastic, so it’s fine. But as a supreme hunter, she has to make sure it is very, very dead. This ball ain’t gonna bounce no more!

 

How to – with Little Monkey. No 2. Chase Squirrels

There are two methods, depending on whether you are at home, or running around the forest.

Method One: At home. Lie in absolute stillness on the stoep. Watch the happy little squirrel as it checks the coast is clear, before cautiously descending face first from the Eugenia tree. Hold your breath as you watch it dart from place to place on the lawn, scratching here and there.

When a person walks past you, suddenly leap into the air barking (great for giving them a heart attack!) and hare at top speed after the squirrel. Dance along the wall yipping as the squirrel disappears next door for a little more peace and quiet.

Method Two: In the forest. Race madly from side to side, dashing full speed straight at any perceived “little grey animal” movement. Scramble up the tree trunk as far as you can, then springboard off it with a double back spin and land on all fours.

Stay under the 40 foot pine tree, dancing and prancing about in the hope that the little grey animal will run back down the trunk and into your open mouth. All the time make the most annoying, high pitched yipping sound, most unlike your usual low bark. Eventually give up, and pronking like a springbok through the undergrowth, look for more easily accessible furry fluff balls to chase.

At some point, realise that Mum and Mr Spaghetti Legs are far away on their more sedate walk, and that, reluctantly, you’d better catch up. Hey wait! There’s another moving grey thing. Tally Ho!

Hunting the Cape Lion

TJ - the Cape Lion

TJ – Heart of a Lion

What is the Cape Lion?

The Cape Lion had black-tipped ears and the male, a massive black mane, reaching behind its shoulders and right under its stomach. The last of its kind was killed in 1858.

There is some debate as to whether the Cape Lion ( Panthera leo melanochaitus ) was a distinct subspecies of lion, many maintaining that it was simply a southern variation of the Transvaal Lion. It was large though, weighing up up to 230kg and 3m in length.

Some zoos (eg in Russia) claimed to have descendants of the Cape Lion, but there has been so much interbreeding it is unlikely that a pure Cape Lion will ever walk along the Cape of Africa again.