Category Archives: Nature

Lavender Blue

Hydrangea 1

Whether you see this as pink, lilac, mauve or purple . . .

Hydrangea 2

I think it is a lovely colour!

Hydrangea 3

This ancient hydrangea was already in the garden when we moved here yonks ago.

Hydrangea 4

The plant looks dead in winter but always amazes me by producing these lovely blooms each spring.

They don’t usually last long in our harsh sun, but I enjoy them while they’re here.

 

post script: I have promised my Northern WP friends gratuitous Spring photos to sustain them as they plunge into the depths of winter! In return they will supply me with Snow Photos in due course, to sustain me during the searing temperatures (38C – 100F) of summer here in Cape Town, South Africa.

post post script: And because I love the song, here is Lavender’s Blue from the movie Cinderella.

 

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Shimmering Reflections

Reflections 1

I have always been fascinated by reflections in water. I can stare for ages transfixed by the rippling images, as one would do a flickering campfire flame.

Reflections 2

Here you see buildings mirrored in the glossy Water of Leith, the main river running through Edinburgh, Scotland, for 35 km, till it flows into the Firth of Forth at Leith and thence into the sea.

Reflections 3

It was a little windier on our return trip walking back up the river, as can be seen by the cloudy appearance of the water closest to us; the surface whipped up by the strong Scottish wind.

 

Under Pressure

Under Pressure 1

This is what my water bottle from the plane looked like when I got back to Cape Town, after my month away in the UK.

Generally speaking, a large plane flying at high altitudes, like my Boeing 747-400 cruising at 12,200 m (40,000 ft), has to pressurise the air inside the cabin, because the outside air at that altitude is at a much lower pressure than is good for you!

Even so, they don’t quite match the pressures you might experience down on the ground; cabin pressure is usually set to that which you would experience at 1500 m to 2440 m (5000 ft to 8000 ft).

Under Pressure 2

When I got back to my house and took out my water bottle (that had been opened and resealed while up in the air on the plane) the increase in atmospheric pressure here in Cape Town at sea level was enough to squish the plastic bottle.

 

In fact, the pressure that day, according to the barometer in my lounge, was a whopping 104 kPa (780 mm Hg).

No wonder I had a headache!

.

And how could I have a post with this title and not mention  David Bowie and Queen Under Pressure.

 

post script: It has taken me a while (9 drafts) to put this post together, with all the reference material. And though I know that a post like this will not be generally popular, I find it interesting.

In case you’re also interested, here are a whole lot of links so you can read up on this subject. You’re welcome!

cabin pressure  versus air pressure   and cabin altitude

Physics experiment of a plastic bottle on a plane.

Table of atmospheric pressure at different altitudes.

Diagram of how cold it is at different altitudes.

Health advice before you travel by air.

 

Apple Blossom

Apple Blossom

High up at the top of my ancient tree I spotted the first apple blossom of spring.

To snap the photo, I had to stretch my arm right up above my head and hope I was aiming my little point and click Canon camera in the right general direction.

I could have done with a selfie stick!

 

Catch a Falling Star!

Catch the Moon

Catch a falling star

And put it in your pocket

Save it for a rainy day

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The large fir tree in my garden delicately balances the Moon on one outstretched finger.

Yes, I know the Moon is not a star and though I did find a song called Catch the Moon, I’d never heard of it before, and I doubt anyone else has either. So, poetic licence, Catch a Falling Star it is!

And for those of you with good memories, yes I did have a similar post, nine months ago. I would have put a link to it here, but then I find I get a lot of spam.

post script: Catch a Falling Star was written by Paul Vance and Lee Pockriss. It was released in 1957 and famously sung by Perry Como.