Tag Archives: Cape Sparrow

Next Generation

Baby White Eye 1

Haiku 228

Little fluffy balls

Peeping away constantly

Next generation

.

Baby White Eye 2

Baby Cape White Eye, Mum and Dad are worn to a frazzle feeding you; keeping up with your demands!

But you are so very cute.

Baby White Eye 3

A spherical blob of downy feathers; tail and wings half grown; your flight a flurry of frantic flapping that carries you to the nearest branch. Mum and Dad are ever vigilant; concerned for your welfare.

Three Baby Chicks 4

The baby White Eye joined up with a couple of baby Cape Sparrows, locally known as Mossies.

Three Baby Chicks 5

It’s a little chick creche. I guess safety in numbers!

Three Baby Chicks 6

Either way, it’s cuteness overload!

 

Unusually, it was an overcast grey morning with what little sunlight there was, shining from behind the birds. My Canon camera does not do well in low light, so some of these photos are grainy and blurry.

 

Baby Visitor

Baby Mossie 1

Baby Mossie 1

I spotted this little cutie on my lawn the other day and managed to snap a few photos. It is a baby male Mossie, or Cape Sparrow.

Baby Mossie 2

Baby Mossie 2

I was hiding way back inside the house, as usual, while I took a few shots of the little chap, who was quite unawares. However, his Dad decided enough was enough. He flew down from the roof where he’d been keeping a watchful eye on his son, swooped over the chick while chirping and got it to follow him to safety.

Two weeks earlier I’d taken these photos.

Baby Mossie 3

Baby Mossie 3

Here the chick actually looks more like a duckling and he reminds me of the ones I photographed in Pit Pat Paddle Pat and Family Outing.

Baby Geese

Baby Geese

But his Dad was still looking out for him, as you can see from the following photo.

Baby Mossie 4

Baby Mossie 4

Ah, Spring; isn’t it wonderful?

 

Mossie

Mossie 1

Mossie 1

The male Cape Sparrow, or Mossie as he is known locally, sports a striking coat of feathers, as he sits on my grape vine.

Mossie 2

Mossie 2

His wife, on the other hand, is a drab little thing.

Mossie 3

Mossie 3

The way that there was one bird, then two, then one again reminded me of the nursery rhyme, Two Little Dickie Birds.

Unfortunately, I only managed to photograph them from behind, while I hid inside the house (in my usual fashion!)

I did get some good shots of a Cape Sparrow previously though: Ruffled feathers and Like father like son.

 

Like Father; Like Son

Baby Mossie 1

Baby Mossie 1

This little chap flew into my daughter’s bedroom via a small open window last week. It must have taken some manoeuvering through the burglar bars! (Pictured here by a large window, not the small one it flew through.)

Baby Mossie 2

Baby Mossie 2

I didn’t want to stress the little guy any more than I had to, so took just a few quick shots, as I slowly approached the window where he was trapped.

Baby Mossie 3

Baby Mossie 3

As you can see from these photos, he was very scared and bashing his wings and tail and everything against the window and bars.

I finally got the window open enough for him to fly out. I hope he was only a bit bruised and not damaged.

You might remember my post last week, Ruffled Feathers, about an adult male Mossie (Cape Sparrow) who flew splat into my lounge window from outside in the garden. I can only think this little chick is his son, as he seems to have inherited the genes for flying into windows!

Like father; like son!

 

Ruffled Feathers!

Mossie 1

Mossie 1

This little bird flew straight into my window the other day.

He sat on the ledge for a moment, obviously a bit stunned, then flitted up onto the fence to recover.

Mossie 2

Mossie 2 – Ruffled!

He fluffed up his feathers in a shrug, looking like a dancer swishing her skirts.

Mossie 3

Mossie 3 – That’s better

Then he looked around for a second, wondering what had just happened, before flying off again.

The male Cape Sparrow, or Mossie as he is locally known, is a splendid little fellow, much more brightly attired than his European counterpart. Though, perhaps not surprisingly in the bird world, the female is a plain drab brown!

 

post script: Once again, these photos were taken from way back inside my lounge, which explains the hazy look. I really must wash that window!!