Tag Archives: Little Monkey

Evil Dog?

Little Monkey - Always ready for Mischief

Little Monkey – Always ready for Mischief

Poor misunderstood Little Monkey!

I had just returned home from walking the dogs and was removing their leads, when I noticed LM suddenly become alert. I knew something was going on so I grabbed her by the scruff of the neck then looked round. Sure enough, my neighbour walked past our security gate, with his floor mop dog lunging towards us and yapping like mad.

He told his dog, “Come on, leave it. Evil Dog!”

In his mind that is what he thinks.

Little Monkey is just anxious and reacts out of fear when a dog is suddenly there, even if it is half her size.

But my neighbour does not know this. He also does not see that his dog, although a small black and white floor mop, is pulling at the lead, straining to get to us and barking constantly. He doesn’t stop his dog’s behaviour and has no control at all over his little mop! (But, you know, it’s OK, because it is small and cute! This is a sad misconception of many small dog owners.)

In fact, the only well-behaved dog in this whole interaction was old Mr Spaghetti Legs, who made no move to go to the gate or bark back at the little mop, but just stood there by me, waiting patiently. (All he is thinking is, “Walk is over, now Mum makes my supper!”)

I know my neighbour was only joking when he called Little Monkey Evil Dog, but it rankled with me: hence this post to set the record straight!

Little Monkey is an anxious dog, who, despite my best efforts to overcome the damage done during her early life, before I adopted her, still freaks out when suddenly confronted by a dog.

But – she hasn’t got a mean bone in her body!

 

 

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Hello

Little Monkey

Little Monkey

Little Monkey here! My Mum, Scifi, has sprained her right wrist and it is very sore to use her hand, so she asked me to write this post for her.

Oh, before you get the wrong idea, I didn’t sprain her wrist! (Not like the time I pulled her arm out the socket!) She has no idea how it happened; she just woke up with her wrist very swollen and extremely painful. I think maybe she was practising kung fu in her sleep!

Just to let you know that she has not forgotten about you all, but that her comments will be minimal till her wrist stops hurting.

It was fun watching her trying to open our tin of dog food left-handed! But I’m happy to say that she managed it, which is all that matters!

 

Three Cheers for Mr Mole!

LM and Mr Mole 1

LM and Mr Mole 1

In the spirit of Enid Blyton, Noddy and Big Ears.

“Oh No!” cried Little Monkey. “Something’s happened to the lawn! What will Mummy say?”

“What is it?” asked Mr Spaghetti Legs, coming over to investigate.

“Look at the grass,” said Little Monkey. “It has been dug up in tunnels!”

Mr Mole 2

Mr Mole 2

“Oh dear!” agreed Mr Spaghetti Legs. “Mummy will be really cross. You know how she hates it when we dig up the lawn!”

Mummy came out of the house and the two friends looked up at her in concern.

“Look what’s happened, Mummy,” they said, quickly adding, “It wasn’t us!”

“That’s all right,” said Mummy smiling. “It is just Mr Mole.”

“Mr Mole?” asked Little Monkey.

Mr Mole 3

Mr Mole 3

“Yes,” said Mummy. “Some bugs were eating my lawn, and I asked Mr Mole if he would like to have his dinner here last night. And he agreed.”

“So it is a good thing?” asked Mr Spaghetti Legs, wondering how he could also get to chew up the lawn.

“Yes, it is,” agreed Mummy.

“Three Cheers for Mr Mole!” cried Little Monkey and Mr Spaghetti Legs.

 

post script: I loved Enid Blyton as a child, and avidly read all the Noddy and Big Ears books, all the tales of Toyland and more. I know poor Enid has since fallen out of favour; her writing being criticised for all sorts of things, but here’s one little girl who will be forever grateful for the fantastic journeys I took with her, and later passed on to my children.

post post script: The sticky things on the mole runs are the stalks from the orange berries that have fallen from the Syringa tree. Squirrels and birds eat the berries.

 

 

A Wee Bit Chilly

Barometer

Barometer

This is what our temperature was yesterday morning.

Barometer 2

Barometer 2

Yes, I know 12C is nothing to you guys in the Northern hemisphere: probably even in summer!

But the barometer stands in my lounge. This definitely feels jolly cold!

Yes, I could switch on a thermostatically controlled electric oil heater, (many Capetonians will heat their homes, or at least a room, somehow), but electricity is expensive. The last time my heater was used was during a cold snap in winter about 4 years ago, when a friend was over for afternoon tea and I took pity on her shivering! Remember I am from the North of England.

My husband and I just wear more clothes, or blankets in the early morning or evening.

Most of my dogs, Lady, Madam, TJ, have been fine, as they had that extra downy undercoat. Mr Spaghetti Legs, although not having the under-layer, has a thick coat and never appears cold (you know, curled up in a tight ball with nose tucked under tail and all legs plaited.)

But two of my dogs, who looked very similar, have bred themselves on the streets of Cape Town to withstand searing summer temperatures, even going so far as to lie baking in full sun on the hottest of days. This was old Jack, and of course, Little Monkey. For her, and previously for him, we throw a thick blanket over her little curled up, plaited body, as she lies on her bed. She soon gets toasty warm. Snug as a bug in a rug!

Jack sunbathing

Jack sunbathing

Little Monkey Sunbathing

Little Monkey Sunbathing

 

 

Oh You Little Monkey!

Little Monkey - Always ready for Mischief

Little Monkey – Always ready for Mischief

I always say I won’t adopt a dog that I can’t handle. I have to be able to lift her into, and out of, the car by myself. I have to be strong enough that she won’t pull me down the street, when instinct takes over, all her training goes up in smoke as she goes haring after a cat or squirrel. This is one reason why Mr Spaghetti Legs is smaller than Little Monkey.

However, LM is still giving me a hard time!

The other day I’d walked my dogs most of the way round the block. I’d intended to go a little farther to the park, but the wind was cold and old SL was hobbling, so we kept it short.

I was waiting to cross the road when a car pulled up on the opposite side, and the guy asked for directions to a street nearby. I crossed over and started discussing with him where the road was. It’s a bit of a rabbit warren around our neighbourhood so we were having quite a chat, me with me head in the passenger side window, my dogs waiting patiently at the side.

Next thing LM bounds forwards, barking, and pulls me right off my feet. Fortunately it was a grass verge, but still! There I am, stretched out full length, and scrabbling to my feet, trying to reel her in at the same time, when she lunges forwards and pulls me over again!

I finally get her close enough and shove her into a down.

What caused all this? A neighbour had come round the corner with his small little floor mop dog, and LM freaked out! I mean really? *Still, after all these years? (I’ve had her over eight years.)

Freak over, she’s fine again. And get this, my neighbour is apologising to me! Of course, I apologised back profusely, but people are beginning to realise poor old LM is just anxious and overreacts. Once stopped and given time she’s fine again.

But the end result of all this is that she has wrenched my right wrist quite badly, and also my arm and shoulder. I can feel it all seizing up as I type this!

Next dog I get will have to be a Teacup Yorkie!!

 

*post script: Why does LM react this way? Before I adopted her, she was unsocialised for the first 18 months of her life. She missed out on all the important things a dog needs to learn, to be sociable and get along with other dogs; such as meeting lots of different dogs (and people) and exploring many different environments. A more balanced, confident dog may have coped with this lack of socislisation in its early life, but LM is an anxious dog, way down the pecking order of the pack, at the Omega end. She will never completely overcome her early upbringing, though we have made huge improvements.

What would LM have done if she had escaped the lead? She’d have run towards the little dog barking, stopped a few metres away, turned and trotted back to me. I think you’ll all agree this is not normal behaviour!

Why does LM freak out? She goes into instant terror when she sees another dog suddenly appear, from round the corner etc. She takes much longer than the average dog to understand that the new dog is not a threat. (Lack of puppy socialisation.)

That being said, she is superb at reading dog energies, and half the problem is that most of the dogs we encounter are not balanced. Their owners think their dogs are fine, but what I see, and what LM certainly sees, is a dog out in front of its owner, pulling on the lead, in the position of pack leader; a dog with high energy, or anxious energy; a dog all over the place and not listening to its owner. The calm, confident dogs we meet on our walks are very few and far between. Mr Spaghetti Legs is one, but of course, Little Monkey is not!

Did you miss me?

"Are you my Mummy?" asks LM

“Are you my Mummy?” asks LM

Apparently, not much!

Which is fine, as it means that my dogs Little Monkey and Mr Spaghetti Legs were happy in my absence; and proves once again that we can learn much from our dogs, who live in the present.

Are you Really my Mum?

Are you Really my Mum?

LM takes a very close look at me on my return, to check I really am her Mum!

SL also having a good look

SL also having a good look

Like LM, Mr SL would also rise like a Lipizzaner horse to get a better look, if his spaghetti legs allowed.

Has anyone noticed, by SL’s back legs, the Kong that defies gravity? LM picked it up to shove in my face, as her own way of saying “Hi”, and has just dropped it. The photo caught it mid-air.