Tag Archives: plants

Sunbird Defender

Male Sunbird 1

Haiku 227

Valiant Sunbird

Defender of the tiny

Mighty nonetheless

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Female and Male Sunbird 2

The female Sunbird has dull grey plumage and is difficult to spot. Above, she is feeding from the yellow honeysuckle in the bottom left of the photo, while the male flies off, in the top right.

Male Sunbird 3 – Dark

The male Lesser Double-Collared Sunbird perches above the female on the newly-awakened grape vines, keeping a lookout while she is feeding. He appears dark grey in this photo, as it is only the bright sunlight reflecting off his feathers that makes them iridesce, and the angle is wrong here.

Male Sunbird 4 – Hidden

They are tiny birds, with a very high pitched twitter. I constantly hear the male defending his territory, and his female, from other males.

The male can also be hard to spot, especially when he hides behind the leaves as above!

Male Sunbird 5

But how magnificent he is when perched in full sunlight!

 

Hi – Hibiscus

Hibiscus 1

Haiku 225

Spring into brightness

Large, radiant and cheerful

Welcome arrival

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Hibiscus 2

Another welcome springtime return; my trusty old peach-coloured hibiscus.

 

Frankly my Dear, I don’t give a Fig!

Cape Black Fig 1

Haiku 224

Nature’s recipe

Give me sunlight and water

I’ll make you a fig

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Cape Black Fig 2

A friend gave us a few small fig plants a year ago and already one of them, a Cape Black, has produced two figs.

Cape Black Fig 3

Yes, tiny as they are, these are actual figs! The plant itself is about a foot tall and I wasn’t expecting any fruit for a good many years.

What a lovely surprise from Nature.

 

post script: The title is a reference to Rhett Butler’s last line to Scarlett O’Hara in the 1939 movie, Gone With The Wind; “Frankly my dear, I don’t give a dam!”

 

Raindrops On Freesias

Purple Freesia 1

Haiku 223

Tiny crystal balls

Microscopic universe

Raindrops on Freesias

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Purple Freesia 2

I love finding great big fat raindrops on my plants.

Purple Freesia 3

Not just because it means that rain has fallen, but because it is so beautiful; nature enhanced.

Purple Freesia 4

Of course, with or without raindrops, I do like my purple freesias;

Purple Freesia 5

And their subtle, heavenly scent.

 

Exposure

Syringa Tree 1 – Pruned

Haiku 220

A short back and sides

Just a little off the top

Oopsie! A crew cut!

.

 

Catching the setting sun in its bare branches, both the syringa tree and the photo are over-exposed!

Syringa Tree 2

Every six or so years we have the large trees in our garden heavily pruned. It just keeps them in check. We’d gone round the garden several times with the tree guy, making sure he knew exactly what we wanted pruning and by how much.

The boss got his guys set up and then left. There were about five men all round the garden hacking back various trees and bushes, armed with ladders and chainsaws.

We also left them to it – did not want to be anywhere near all those chainsaws! – which is how the syringa got more of a close shave than we intended.

Syringa Tree 3 – Pruned

After only two weeks I spotted this new growth sprouting from a smaller branch. After another two weeks I noticed even the thick branches were beginning to push out a few budding leaves.

In no time at all the syringa will be growing new small branches covered in leaves.

Hopefully, it won’t need pruning for another six years!

 

Spring is in the Air

Red Freesia 1

Haiku 218

A little treasure

Hidden in a winter pot

Surprise! Spring Freesia

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Red Freesia 2

Most of my few surviving freesias are yellow, so it was lovely to find this solitary red one popping up in an abandoned flower pot; providing a welcome warm colour in our most changeable season.

Red Freesia 3

One day the sun bakes down ferociously, then the next temperatures drop rapidly, with driving rains and howling winds.

Red Freesia 4

Throughout it all, this brave little freesia just keeps on blooming.

 

Stolen

Variegated Plant 1

Haiku 215

If you grow my side

Technically you are now mine!

Law of the jungle

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Variegated Plant 2

So how did I steal these plants?

There used to be a broken down wooden fence between my property and the neighbours. This old fence became overgrown with their creeping ivy, bulging out on both sides, till nothing remained of the fence.

Underneath the ivy, in a few places, some of the neighbour’s plants grew through on my side.

Variegated Plant 3

Two and a half years ago we replaced the mass of overgrown ivy with a vibracrete wall on the property line. I planted four honeysuckle bushes along my side and carefully tended them. I noticed a few straggly bits of plant had survived from the neighbour’s side, even after the wall was built. Well, as Nature knows no boundaries, it’s Finders Keepers and all the more for me!

Variegated Plant 4

I also carefully tended these stolen plants; weeding and watering along with the honeysuckle. The plants have variegated leaves of green and white and are pretty to look at, even without any flowers. In fact, I didn’t know they were supposed to bloom.

However, they have finally rewarded all my gardening by producing a few purple flowers. Now they are even prettier.

How lovely. Stolen plants and free flowers!

 

Renewal

Erica 1

Haiku 214

Delicate as lace

Tiny tinkling flower bells

Spring is in the air

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Erica 2

Mr Spaghetti legs’ plant returns each Spring.

Although it isn’t really Spring till next month, I am certainly not complaining. I’m always happy to see the plant is surviving and even growing a little each year. You can see just how small it is by the bricks.

Erica 3

This plant with the tiny delicate flowers is a fynbos, Erica Quadrangularis.

Mr Spaghetti Legs.

Mr SL is all ears